Brand Awareness

What Using Low Quality Images Does To Your Brand Awareness?

After you’ve created a perfect custom website for your business, you need to ensure that you can maintain your audience. One of the key ways to do this is through establishing a potent awareness of your brand.

There’s plenty of information out there which advises you how to increase your brand’s awareness, but factors which may damage this are less discussed. You could have the perfect online space, paired with a strong online and offline marketing campaign; you might even have the ideal product, placed right in the line-of-sight of the customer. But this can all be thrown away through small, overlooked elements of marketing – even the smallest detail can have a detrimental impact on your marketing campaign, and this is certainly true regarding image quality.

You may dismiss this issue, and understandably so. The idea that you’ll directly damage your brand awareness through a single image is a preposterous idea. But once you’ve realized how significant images are in the perception of any brand, this idea becomes a lot more believable. Let’s briefly look at the key components of a modern marketing strategy: If you utilise promoted social media posts, blogs and elements of content marketing, or even traditional print-based advertising, images will contribute a significant portion of each individual advertisement. From the smallest newspaper advert to a wide-reaching Facebook campaign, you cannot effectively run such an effort without utilising a considerable number of images to affirm your brand.

When we account for the resulting effect of images, their significance is clear; the power of these visual signifies can result in increased engagement and more positive responses, as visual information is processed much more quickly than traditional text. The user-friendly nature of imagery ensures that your content is accessible and easy to understand, subsequently extending the reach and knowledge of your brand.

Firstly, before we look at the impact of low-quality images, what defines them? Of course, the first red flag would be the objective quality of the image, chiefly its resolution; if an image is blurred, pixelated, or inadequately edited, it represents a lack of care on behalf of the brand. Such images denote frugal marketing campaigns, and if you’re cutting costs with your images, how can you be expected to produce a quality product? Furthermore, if an image doesn’t fit with previous style guidelines (such as a traditional, cliched, stock photo), it may well have a similar impact. Finally, if an image doesn’t display relevant content, it simply won’t support the messages at the heart of your campaign. This image, for example, isn’t necessarily of a substandard quality; the resolution could be higher, but the issue lies with the context and subject matter. A generic image such as this does nothing to draw interest to your campaign.

As we’ve established, image use is a cornerstone of any serious marketing campaign, regardless of its intent, format and execution. But let’s say that you were to attempt a campaign with inferior quality images- What could you expect to happen?

Utilising images which fit any of the above criteria as ones of inferior quality will lead to severe negative effects on the perception and reputation of your brand. In an increasingly competitive online world, great first impressions are vital, as customers will utilise any excuse to look elsewhere. Poor images directly harm your reputation, and hence the awareness of your brand. They directly increase your bounce rate and diminish your online presence. Subsequently, such imagery even diminishes the value of your products. Contrastingly, high-quality images get more exposure, more clicks, and hence a better rate of conversion.

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